Invited Talks/Seminars


Speaker: Professor Manjul Gupta

Affiliation: IIT Kanpur

Date: 10 October, 2022 (Monday)

Time: 11:00 AM

Venue:  LT-18

Title: Vedic Mathematics

Abstract: The talk is of introductory nature. "How do our ancient sutras make the calculations easy?" will be illustrated in this talk.



Speaker: Professor M. K. Kadalbajoo

Affiliation: LNMIIT

Date: April 21, 2022 (Thursday)

Time: 4:00 PM

Venue:  LT-16

Title: The Mysteries of Zero and Infinity

Abstract: Traversing very quickly through more than two millennia and from Greek philosophy (Archimedes, Aristotle, Ptolemy, Pythagoras) to Indian discovery (Pingala, Bhaskara, Brahmagupta, Aryabhata), we shall unravel mysteries about the two fascinating and important Numbers-Zero and Infinity- including some very famous paradoxes, the Calculus of Newton & Leibnitz, some relevant fundamental and revolutionary notions given by Gauss, Riemann, Cantor… in discourse. In the latter part of the lecture (time permitting), we shall briefly mention the cross-over of Zero from Mathematics to Physics and talk very briefly about the revolutionary concepts of the last century, namely, the Relativistic Zero and the Quantum Zero and in passing the Black Holes. The quote “Zero will have the last laugh” would end the lecture.


Guest Speaker: Prof. Parthasarathi Mukhopadhyay

Affiliation: Ramakrishna Mission Residential College (Autn.), Narendrapur, Affiliated to University of Calcutta

Date: March 14, 2022 (International PI Day)

Title of the talk: Glimpses of Ancient Indian Mathematics

Google Meet link: meet.google.com/dnu-kmqg-nmf

Abstract: Though India in Antiquity is generally well-known among common educated folks for its lofty philosophical ideas and thoughts, its unique mathematical achievements have not come to the limelight with equal importance and glory, possibly but for one instance: transformation of the philosophical idea of SUNYA into the invention of mathematical ZERO as a number in its own right in tandem with the decimal place-value notation, which is recognized nowadays worldwide as a cornerstone of human civilization, peerless among the advancement of knowledge as a whole. However, this unique accolade has somewhat eclipsed many a praiseworthy and deep mathematical idea that evolved and flourished in India during ancient time, most of which now go by the names of one European mathematician or the other from decidedly later period of time. This happened mostly due to our general ignorance that crept in through either colonial bias of some early British historians of this period, or political/ideological compulsion of upholding the “Greek supremacy” by some relatively modern “Eurocentric” historians/scholars, which can be traced in the historiography of ancient India. On the other hand, recent times have witnessed a few tall claims about ancient Indian scientific achievements, mostly made from non-academic quarters, without much of proper scientific, analytic or historical back-up, which tends to put any sceptic mind in the denial mode about any and every achievement as a whole. However, not an iota of braggadocio is needed to appreciate the mathematical achievements of ancient India, if we objectively look at the long list of unparalleled feats attained.  To mention only a few, these include results of plane Geometric exact constructions to be found in the SulbaSutras, based on the enunciation of the so called “Pythagorean theorem”, much ahead of the Greek “origin” of plane geometry; a lineage of combinatorial marvels starting from Pingalachandasutra of third century B.C., leading to results, now commonly known as “Pascal’s triangle”, “binary numbers and  conversion of binary to decimal and vice versa”, “binomial coefficients” etc. about two thousand years ahead of their rediscovery in Europe by Pascal and Leibniz respectively, to the prakrit works of Virahanka in 600 C.E. which is now referred to as Fibonacci numbers;  Arithmetical gems in the Bakshali manuscript, e.g., sum of arithmetical progression, calculation of weighted arithmetic mean, rule for finding approximate square root of a non-square integer, which is akin to Newton’s calculus-based later work known as Newton-Raphson method; solutions of indeterminate equations--- Kuttaka algorithm of Aryabhata, his calculation of approximate value of pi;   the algebraic principle of Bhavana by Brahmagupta (one of whose brilliant work is now erroneously referred to as Pell’s equation) towards solving some specific quadratic “Diophantaine equations”, which was later furthered by Bhaskara II and Jayadeva through Chakravala algorithm; the series expansions of trigonometric functions achieved by the Kerala school of Madhava of Sangamagram and his disciples, e.g., Madhava-Gregory series of arctangent function,  some two hundred years before inception of calculus in the West,  etc.

In this talk, we shall try to throw some light on a few of these achievements in a nutshell manner.


Guest Speaker: Prof. M. K. Kadalbajoo

Affiliation: LNMIIT

Date: February 28, 2022 (Monday)(National Science Day)

Time: 4:00 PM

Venue:  LT-16

Google meet link: meet.google.com/asi-mkfx-aut

Title: An optimal error estimate of an IMEX finite element method for some partial integro-differential equations arising in finance

Abstract: Over the past few decades, the growth of the derivative markets has been a major development in finance. Among the most popular derivatives, options are actively traded in the financial world. The price of a European option, under the Black-Scholes jump-diffusion model, is governed by a parabolic partial integro-differential equation (PIDE). The aim of this talk is to present a finite element method combined with an implicit-explicit (IMEX) time-stepping procedure for the aforementioned PIDE. Since the pay-off function (i.e., the final condition of the PIDE) is in general not smooth enough and hence, over the whole domain, the solution of the PIDE is also not smooth enough. Therefore, in the natural norm, one can not achieve an optimal rate of convergence of the numerical method. With realistic regularity assumptions on the data and without any severe step-size restrictions, an optimal error estimate for the proposed method will be provided under a certain weighted Sobolev norm. The theoretical findings and the efficiency of the proposed method will be demonstrated by some numerical experiments.

About the Speaker: Prof. M K Kadalbajoo is the retired professor from the department of Mathematics, IIT Kanpur. He is currently working as distinguished professor in the department of mathematics, The LNM Institute of Information Technology, Jaipur. He received his Ph.D. degree from IIT Bombay in 1976. His research area is Numerical analysis and parallel algorithms. He was awarded the C.L Chandna Mathematics Award for distinguished and outstanding contributions in Mathematics Research and Teaching (1998). He is the Fellow, National Academy of Sciences, India (1996). He worked as an expert member in many government committees.


Guest Speaker: Prof. Sudhir Ghorpade

Affiliation: IIT Bombay

Date: December 27, 2021(Monday)

Time: 11:30 AM

Venue:  LT-5

Title: Number of common zeros of systems of polynomials over finite fields

Google meet link: https://meet.google.com/ube-tdnc-asb

Abstract: It is elementary and well-known that a polynomial in one variable of degree d with coefficients in a field F has at most d zeros in F. An analogue of this for homogeneous polynomials is that a homogeneous polynomial in two variables of degree d with coefficients in F has at most d non-proportional zeros in F 2 (excluding the origin). We note that d is a “good” bound in the sense that if F has at least d elements, then there are polynomials of degree d that attain this bound. When F is a finite field with q elements, it makes sense to ask similar questions for the number of common zeros of systems of multivariable polynomials of a given degree. A remarkable answer for the general case of r linearly independent polynomials of degree d in m variables over the field with q elements was given by Heijnen and Pellikaan in 1998. The analogous problem for systems of multivariable homogeneous polynomials turned out to be more challenging, and answers were known only in the case of a single polynomial or a system of two linearly independent polynomials, thanks to the work of Serre (1991) and Boguslavsky (1997). For the general case, there was an elaborate conjecture by Boguslavsky and Tsfasman that remained open for almost two decades. In this talk we will outline some recent progress on this conjecture as well as some newer developments. This is based on a joint work with M. Datta, and also with P. Beelen and M. Datta. Most of the talk should be accessible to anyone with undergraduate-level background in mathematics.

  • An Invited Talk by Prof. Anish Ghosh, TIFR Bombay on “An invitation to ergodic theory”, December 22, 2021. (National Mathematics Day)
  • An Invited Talk by Prof. Kadalbajoo, LNMIIT on “Remembering Srinivasa Ramanujan, A Legendary Mathematician of the 20th Century” December 22, 2021 (National Mathematics Day)

Guest Speaker: Prof. S. Kesavan

Affiliation: IIT Madras

Date: December 22, 2021(Wednesday) (National Mathematics Day)

Time: 11:30 AM

Venue: LT-5

Title: An invitation to ergodic theory

Google meet link: Meet - drx-soin-nbd (google.com)

Abstract: Ergodic theory is the mathematical study of "chaotic" systems. I will explain what this means and how it connects to an entirely different branch of mathematics, namely the study of numbers.


Guest Speaker: Prof. Anish Ghosh

Affiliation: TIFR Bombay

Date: December 22, 2021(Wednesday) (National Mathematics Day)

Time: 10:00 AM

Venue: LT-5

Title: From the triangle inequality to the isoperimetric inequality

Google meet link: Meet - drx-soin-nbd (google.com)

Abstract: Starting from the basic geometric result that the sum of the lengths of two sides of a triangle is greater than the length of the third side, we will look at a series of shape optimisation problems involving polygons and finally arrive at the classical isoperimetric inequality in the plane. The talk will be accessible to all persons familiar with high school geometry (triangles) and basic notions of analysis (like supremum, elementary limits).


Guest Speaker: Prof. M. K. Kadalbajoo

Affiliation: LNMIIT

Date: December 22, 2021(Wednesday) (National Mathematics Day)

Time: 12:30 PM

Venue: LT-5

Title: Remembering Srinivasa Ramanujan, A Legendary Mathematician of the 20th Century

Google meet link: Meet - drx-soin-nbd (google.com)

Abstract: The talk would very briefly traverse through the life of the great and legendary mathematician, Srinivasa Ramanujan, followed by a peep into some of his outstanding and phenomenal contribution that attracted and engaged the attention of several great mathematicians for over a century leading to exemplary advances in many branches of mathematics.


Guest Speaker: Prof. Bimal Roy

Affiliation: ISI Kolkata

Date: December 14, 2021(Tuesday)

Time: 11:30 AM

Venue: LT-5

Title: On Recent Issues of Cryptology

Google meet link: meet.google.com/qym-diub-kaz

Abstract: The concepts like Data Obfuscation, Zero Knowledge Protocols, E-voting, Matroids in Secret Sharing etc. will be explained with illustrations and applications.


Guest Speaker: Prof. Amitabha Tripathi

Affiliation: IIT Delhi

Date: November 25, 2019 (Monday)

Time: 3:00 PM

Venue: LT-5

Title: A Gentle Introduction to Ramsey’s Theorems.

Abstract: Two players sit in front of a hexagonal board with vertices labelled 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Player A has a red marker while player B has a blue marker. Player A goes first and draws a line joining any two vertices with his marker. Player B then selects a different pair of points and joins them with his marker. The two players take turns drawing lines between pairs of points hitherto unmarked. The player who first succeeds in having a triangle with all sides of his colour wins. Is it possible for the game to end in a draw? The answer is No! This leads to the determination of the Ramsey number R(3, 3). More generally, the determination of the (classic) Ramsey numbers R(m, n) for different pairs of positive integers m, n has been the central theme of Ramsey’s theorem.


Guest Speaker: Professor Marie-Françoise Roy

Affiliation: University of Rennes, France

Date: February 14, 2020 (Friday)

Time: 3:00 PM

Venue: LT-9

Title: Bernstein polynomials, computer-aided geometric design and real algebraic applications.

Abstract: Bernstein polynomials serve as the mathematical foundation for modern computer-aided geometric design (CAGD). Popular programs, like Adobe's Illustrator and Flash, and font imaging systems such as Postscript, utilize Bernstein polynomials to form what are known as Bézier curves. Introduced in the 1960's, Bézier curves were first implemented in automobile design but quickly gained popularity in other areas of CAGD with the expansion of the digital age. The Bernstein polynomials, however, came about long before the invention of computers and were introduced by the russian mathematician, Sergei Natanovich Bernstein, as a means to prove the Weierstrass Approximation Theorem. These polynomials are currently widely used in approximation theory, probability, but also provide certificates of positivity in real algebraic geometry.


Guest Speaker: Prof Carsten Carstensen

Affiliation: Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

Date: March 5, 2020 (Thursday)

Time: 10:00 am

Venue: LT-5

Title: Challenges in Computational Calculus of Variations: 3 Examples in 1D.

Abstract: Three examples in the calculus of variations serve as master examples to illustrate what can go wrong in the minimization of a functional. The three disaster problems will be explained and illustrate the direct method in the calculus of variations and the success or failure of the simplest finite element approximation. Some illustrations for real-life applications will give an outlook at the computational calculus of variations.


Guest Speaker: Prof. A. S. Vasudeva Murthy

Affiliation: TIFR-CAM, Bangalore,

Date: November 1, 2019 (Friday)

Time: 4:00 PM

Venue: LT-5

Title: Far Field Boundary Conditions and their Approximation.

Abstract: Many PDE's are often formulated in unbounded domains. However for computing the solutions numerically we need to truncate it to a bounded domain. This introduces artificial boundaries and consequently artificial boundary conditions (ABC). The choice of ABC can be tricky and can lead to wrong solutions. We give a brief survey for ABC with some simple examples.


Guest Speaker: Prof G.K. Srinivasan

Affiliation: IIT Bombay

Date: September 13, 2018 (Thursday)

Time: 05:15 PM

Venue: LT-5

Title: Isoperimetric Inequalities.

Abstract: This is an old classical result with many modern ramifications. We shall give two proofs of this inequality and also discuss connections with other analytic inequalities such as the Sobolev inequality and the Coarea formula. We also discuss some further ramifications.


Guest Speaker: Prof. Manjul Gupta

Affiliation: IIT Kanpur

Date: November 5, 2019 (Tuesday)

Time: 4:00 PM

Venue: LT-5

Title: Matrix Transformations on Sequence Spaces.

Abstract: A finite matrix of order mn, defines a continuous linear transformation from a vector space of dimension n to a vector space of dimension m and vice-versa. The natural question is “what can we say about infinite matrices?” After giving brief introduction of sequence spaces, in this talk we consider this aspect of sequence space theory which dates back to the beginning of the last century in the work of G. Kothe and O. Toeplitz.


Guest Speaker: Dr. Charu Goel

Affiliation: IIIT Nagpur

Date: February 15, 2020 (Saturday)

Time: 9:00 AM

Venue: LT-5

Title: Positive Polynomials and Sums of Squares.

Abstract: Sums of squares representations of polynomials is of fundamental importance in real algebraic geometry. Determining the positivity of a polynomial in more than one variable is computationally difficult in general. Writing a polynomial as a sum of squares, on the other hand, provides a computationally tractable certificate of positivity. The study of these two notions goes back to the 1888 seminal paper of Hilbert, where he gave a full characterization of all pairs (n, d) for which every nonnegative (positive) polynomial of a fixed degree d in a given number of variables n is a sum of squares of polynomials. Ninety years later, Choi and Lam asserted that this characterization remains unchanged for symmetric forms. In this talk first some key observations and problems related to Hilbert’s the- orem will be discussed. We then complete the above assertion of Choi-Lam. Along the way, we shall also discuss briefly how test sets for positivity of symmetric polynomials play an important role in establishing this assertion.


Guest Speaker: Prof. MK Kadalbajoo

Affiliation: distinguished professor at LNMIIT

Date: November 14, 2019 (Thursday)

Time: 5:00 PM

Venue: LT-8

Title: Some Fundamental Principles of Numerical Computations.

Abstract: Some fundamental principles of numerical computations and challenges to solve mathematical models to real world phenomena will be discussed


Guest Speaker: Mr. Shankar Veerabathiran

Affiliation: Research Scholar at Ramanujan Institute for Advanced Study in Mathematics, University of Madras.

Date: Oct 12, 2018 (Friday)

Time: 5:00 PM

Venue: LT-4

Title: An invariant subspace theorem.

Abstract: Beurling-Lax-Halmos theorem says that any shift invariant subspace of a vector valued Hardy Hilbert space is given by an isometric (or partially isometric) image of a vector valued Hardy space. Completely contractive covariant representations on sub product systems are important since they provide a unified approach to study commuting as well as non-commuting tuples of operators on Hilbert spaces. In this talk we investigate a Beurling-Lax-Halmos type invariant subspace theorem for completely contractive covariant representations on standard sub product systems. The notion of curvature is also explored which generalizes earlier definitions of curvature due to Arveson, Popescu and Muhly-Solel. This is a joint work with J.Sarkar and Harsh Trivedi.


Guest Speaker: Prof. Jaydeb Sarkar

Affiliation: ISI Bangalore

Date: November 02, 2018 (Friday)

Time: 12:00 Noon

Venue: LT-7

Title: Fibonacci sequence

Abstract: The Fibonacci sequence is the number sequence 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13..... Note that 1 = 1 + 0, 2 = 1 + 1, 3 = 2 + 1, 5 = 3 + 2, 8 = 5 + 3 etc. This talk will be an elementary and modest introduction to the theory of Fibonacci sequence. We will also recall some ideas of Euclid (of Alexandria) and the (geometric/archeological) Concept of ``Golden ratio''. The talk will be aimed at a general audience and is accessible for B.Tech. Students.


Guest Speaker: Prof. S. Kumaresan

Affiliation: University of Hyderabad

Date: January 28, 2019 (Monday)

Time: 4:00 PM

Venue: LT-5

Title: From Coordinates to Manifolds: A setting for Modern Differential Geometry.

Abstract: In this talk, He will start with the genesis of coordinate systems. Then he moves on to a practical definition of a manifold, the basic notions of tangents and transformation laws.


Guest Speaker: Prof. S. Kumaresan

Affiliation: University of Hyderabad

Date: January 29, 2019 (Tuesday)

Time: 4:00 PM

Venue: LT-5

Title: Function Spaces

Abstract: This will be an overview of various results scattered throughout courses in analysis and studied in isolation. The talk will emphasize the recurring themes which exhibit unifying principles of these results. It may be considered as a Global view of analysis.


Guest Speaker: Prof G.K. Srinivasan

Affiliation: IIT Bombay

Date: September 15, 2018 (Saturday)

Time: 09:30 AM

Venue: LT-5

Title: The Gamma Function: An Eclectic tour

Abstract: The ubiquitous gamma function was introduced in analysis by Leonard Euler in a letter to Goldbach nearly 300 years ago. Since its inception it has attracted the attention of almost every eminent mathematician of the eighteenth and nineteenth century and continues to interest the mathematicians of the present generation. The talk will be an expository in which some important historical signposts of the nineteenth century will be discussed. We shall touch upon several diverse approaches to the study of this special function with a sampling of a few proofs (off the beaten track) of some known results and also a discussion of certain less known identities. The talk would conclude with some recent results.


Guest Speaker: Prof. M.K.Kadalbajoo

Affiliation: LNMIIT

Date: October 20, 2018 (Saturday)

Time: 4:00 PM

Venue: LT-4

Title: Mathematics Everywhere.

Abstract: This is an introductory talk without giving mathematical details but describing some of the important and emerging areas where mathematical thinking and maturity finds its presence and we shall start with derivative pricing and end with quantum chaos.


A career counselling Seminar on Cyber Security by Dr. Dheerendra Mishra

Guest Speaker: Chirag Goyal, Director

Affiliation: Bulwark Cyberx

Date: March 17, 2018 (Saturday)

Time: 9:30 AM

Venue: LNMIIT

Title: Cyber Security

Abstract: Chirag Goyal is Certified Ethical Hacker & cyber security and Forensics Consultant. Has worked for the Ministry Of Defence and many other institutions as a Cyber security trainer and forensics investigator.


Guest Speaker: Dr. V.C.V. Rao

Affiliation: C-DAC, Pune

Date: March 21, 2018 (Wednesday)

Time: 11:00 PM

Venue: LT-7

Title: Challenges in Computational Mathematics (High Performance Computing Perspective

Abstract: his talk would be of interest to the general audience, mainly students (both UG & PG), having a background of the broad area of Scientific Computing.


Guest Speaker: Prof. M.K.Kadalbajoo

Affiliation: LNMIIT

Date: September 07, 2017 (Thursday)

Time: 3:00 PM

Venue: LT-7

Title: Computational Mathematics - Some Challenges

Abstract: We shall give very rudimentary details of two very important sub-fields of Computational Mathematics, viz. Numerical Linear Algebra (NLA) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and conclude with some major challenges that need attention.


Guest Speaker: Prof. Tirupathi Gudi

Affiliation: IISc Bangalore

Date: March 27, 2017 (Monday)

Time: 9:00 AM

Venue: LT-5

Title: On Quadratic Finite Element Methods for the Obstacle Problem

Abstract: The quadratic finite element method on simple meshes for two dimensional obstacle problems is known to converge with constraints at the midpoints of the edges. The convergence of analogous quadratic finite element methods is not known for three dimensional problems so far. In this talk, we will design a bubble enriched quadratic finite element and prove the convergence of the method. Further we will discuss numerical experiments to illustrate the theoretical results. This is a joint work with Gaddam Sharat.


Guest Speaker: Prof. Tirupathi Gudi

Affiliation: IISc Bangalore

Date: March 22, 2017 (Wednesday)

Time: 4:00 PM

Venue: LT-5

Title: Stabilization methods for convection-diffusion problem

Abstract: It is well known that the numerical solution of the convection dominated diffusion problem by the standard Galerkin method exhibits spurious oscillations. There were different remedies proposed in the literature to suppress those oscillations and further to enhance the accuracy of the solution by improved order of convergence. Examples are streamline diffusion method, local projection method, bubble stabilization technique, least square method and discontinuous Galerkin method, etc. In this talk, we will discuss on two newly designed methods based on patch-wise local projections by using the conforming finite element space and the nonconforming finite element space, respectively. These methods are defined on a single mesh and without enriching the finite element space. Some numerical examples illustrating the theoretical results will be presented. This is a joint work with Dr. Asha K. Dond.

An invited seminar by Prof. Nandini Nilakantan (IIT Kanpur) on “The KneserConjecture: A proof using the Borsuk Ulam Theorem” March 10, 2015

An invited seminar by Prof. Amber Habib (SNU Noida) on “Black-Scholes PDE in Finance” May 22, 2015.

Lecture series by Prof. Graeme Fair-weather (Colorado School of Mines, (USA) on “Alternating Direction Implicit Orthogonal Spline Collocation Methods for Time-Dependent Problems” March 26, 2014.

An invited seminar by Prof. Amiya K. Pani (IIT Bombay) on “Scientific Computing: A New Way of Looking at Mathematics” March 26, 2014 Lecture series by Prof. P.C. Das on “Inverse Problems” Feb. 7, 2014. An invited seminar by Prof. J.K. Verma (IIT Bombay) on “A recent proof of the fundamental theorem of Algebra” April 17, 2012.

A series of seminars on Partial Differential Equations by Prof. V. Raghavendra (IIT Kanpur) and Prof. Vasudev Murthy (TIFR Bangalore), November 3-4, 2011.